According to the charity Shelter, a total of 222,360 households in England have been tipped into homelessness since the start of the covid pandemic. That’s the shocking equivalent of a city the size of Liverpool.

The charity was reporting on new government figures released on 27th January 2022, which paint a bleak picture of homelessness in England.

Containing the first three full months’ worth of data after the covid eviction ban was lifted, the new statistics show 397 households became homeless every day between July and September 2021.

According to Shelter, the government’s homelessness data also revealed:

More people are facing homelessness as a result of the loss of a private rental. The loss of a private tenancy was given as the reason 20% of all households were found to be homeless or at risk of becoming homeless by their council (13,570 households). This has increased by 42% in a year and is returning to pre-pandemic levels.

4,440 households were threatened with homelessness after receiving a Section 21 ‘no fault’ eviction notice from their landlord – a 33% rise on the previous quarter.

More people are facing homelessness as a result of domestic abuse during the pandemic. Fleeing domestic abuse was given as the reason 13% of all households were found to be homeless or at risk of becoming homeless by their council (8,850 households). This has increased by 6% in a year, and 27% since 2019.

Since the start of the pandemic a total of 222,360 households have been tipped into homelessness – equivalent to a city the size of Liverpool.

You can read more about Shelter’s report here